Archive for January, 2010

2012 is Up for Grabs

Saturday, January 2nd, 2010

I DID NOT UNDERSTAND 2012, you know, the jury was out for lunch, and the astrology seemed incomprehensible, and none of the people I’d asked or encountered for the past 18 years could spell it out for me in a way that went aha, until my friend Bessie, who lives near New Paltz, said casually one day, “2012 is up for grabs.”

This is a composite view of our galaxy, the Milky Way, created in 2001. The band running through the center of our galaxy is at the heart of the creation mythology of the ancient Mayans, who saw it as a gateway through which humanity emerged. Called the Road to Xibalba, it is this band that the position of the Sun aligns with on Dec. 21, 2012, which occurs every 26,000 years. The two are very closely aligned now.

This is a composite view of our galaxy, the Milky Way, created in 2001. The band running through the center of our galaxy is at the heart of the creation mythology of the ancient Mayans, who saw it as a gateway through which humanity emerged. Called the Road to Xibalba, it is this band that the position of the Sun aligns with on Dec. 21, 2012, which occurs every 26,000 years. The two are very closely aligned now.

I’m not sure why that flipped the switch. She said it kind of fast, but I heard her. I think when I understood 2012 as something that is now happening rather than something that would happen, and something we are creating rather than doomed to experience in linear fate-time, it made a lot more sense, particularly the way I like to do the rest of my astrology. It’s good to work with variables.

In other articles in this publication, you’ll read some of the astrological details of 2012 and the years between now and then, both referencing the familiar Western system of planetary movement, and the Mayan system of counting the days. In short, on Dec. 21, 2012, we arrive at the last day of a Mayan Great Cycle, day 13.0.0.0.0. A Great Cycle is 13 cycles of 144,000 days.

That is a 5,125-year process in total, or a total count of 1,872,000 days that, apparently, was backdated long before the ancient Maya had even appeared on the planet, in what is now called Mexico.

Part of the mystery of Dec. 21, 2012 involves why these people chose that particular (and now very-nearby) date as their cyclical end-date; apparently, they started at the end point and worked backwards, so it was not an accident. They did so long before the calendar we use was implemented; long before our own astronomers understood the precession of the equinoxes, on which their cycle is based; way before telescopes, computers, calculators, NASA, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Kopernikus, Galileo, DaVinci or Madonna.

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